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The New Players Guide to Effective Fighter Building


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#1 PSUMike

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 08:50 PM

The noobs guide to fighter building.

Other experienced users can feel to contribute and weigh in their opinions. I have enough fights under my belt that I think I know how to build fighters and I’ve been pretty successful. So I am creating this guide to help some newer users who may not know what they are doing. Now in all cases, conditioning and strength are very important so I am omitting them from essentials. But, on the same coin, they are very easy to train up. So I like to start my guys with 1 strength point and 10 in conditioning and spend a few weeks training them up. I also feel it is beneficial to have a moderate understanding of clinchwork. I like to give all my fighters some clinchwork, but other users may disagree. So, I am also going to omit clinchwork from my guide. I also think its best to have the fast learner trait for all fighters. So I am omitting that as well.
There are several ways to build fighters. Some work, some don’t. This guide should give you a pretty good understanding of how to build a good fighter. I am adding examples from in game fighters.

Styles that work:

Chuck Liddell (my personal favorite and most successful) – This is your standard sprawl and brawl boxer. They require good boxing and wrestling in the main stats. On top of that, good punches, takedown defense, striking defense, and defensive grappling are essential for success. In the physical stats, agility for the striking and balance for the takedown defense will help your guy tremendously. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and Granite Chin
Rufus Lee

Cro Cop – This is your Chuck Liddell with Muay Thai instead of boxing. High MT and wrestling are essential. Good kicks, punches, td defense, striking defense, and defensive grappling will keep the fight on the feet and your shin in your opponent’s jaw. Agility, balance, and flexibility are essential. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and Granite chin
Gay Pride (this is an early stage Cro Cop)

Jake Rosholt – This is your typical one dimensional wrestler. Probably something like wonderful wrestling with a blue belt. Don’t be afraid to put a little in his boxing as well. In order to pull this off, you need high striking defense, takedown offense and defense, as well as ground and pound or submissions (one or the other to start and build the other in the long run) and defensive grappling. The best physicals to have are speed and balance. Recommended hidden stats: Granite chin and big heart
Alexander Karelin

Damien Maia – Your BJJ stud who knows nothing else. There is only one, ONE way to pull this off successfully. High BJJ and the rest in wrestling…any other way is a recipe for failure. Striking defense, takedown offense, submissions, and defensive grappling are all needed to make a Maia. As far as physicals, flexibility and balance will help a lot. Recommended hidden stats: Granite chin and big heart
Wade Wilson

BJ Penn – This is your boxer/BJJ player mix. This one is a bit tricky and somewhat complicated but very effective if you can pull it off successfully. I like to go with high level punches, striking defense, submissions, and defensive grappling. You can also put some into takedown defense and build up his wrestling in case you fight a Maia. For this one, you’ll need agility and flexibility. Recommended hidden stats: KO power and big heart/granite chin
Layne Staley

Matt Hughes – This fighter is a top position grappler but more multi-faceted than a Rosholt. You can probably do it with maybe respectable wrestling and proficient BJJ or something of the sort. In order to pull this off, I suggest good striking defense, takedowns, either GNP or subs (I prefer submissions), and defensive grappling. Physical stats needed are speed and balance. If you go for subs over GNP, add some flexibility as well. Recommended hidden stats: Granite chin and big heart
Steve Austin

Anderson Silva – You guessed it. This is a MT/BJJ player. Maybe Pele would be a better fighter to describe this style but I am not sure how many people know who Jose “Pele” Landi Jons is. But I digress. Here’s how to pull this one off. I like to start them with somewhere around proficient MT and BJJ and then I like to build their boxing. Good kicks, knees, punches, striking defense, submissions, and defensive grappling are needed. You can also throw in some takedown defense and build his wrestling in case you fight a Maia but that is a matter of personal preference. Agility and flexibility are needed to be effective. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and granite chin
Harry Kalas

Josh Koscheck - I am not too familiar with this style as I have never created one of these. But, this is essentially a wrestler with hands. You are going to need high boxing and wrestling, much like a Liddell but you need some other secondary stats that a Liddell wouldn't need. Punches, striking defense, takedown offense and defense, and defensive grappling. As far as physicals go, you'll need agility for striking, speed for the takedowns, and balance to stuff the takedowns and to maintain top control. This is particularly effective due to its versitility. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and either heart or granite chin.
Bulk Bogan

Styles you should avoid:
I am not going to give examples because that has potential to embarrass managers.

Michael Bisping – These guys are mediocre at everything but in reality, they suck in general. They can’t KO people (unless they suck), they can’t sub people (unless they suck), and as soon as they fight a specialized, properly built fighter, they get destroyed. Personally, when I see I am fighting a Bisping, I know I am going to win. Now this is a very controversial topic because some other respected managers will disagree with me and say this is an effective style. I say look at the top 10 P4P and tell me how many Bispings are on that list.

Nate Diaz – High level BJJ and shitty boxing…nothing more. As a general rule of thumb, when you build a high level BJJ player, make sure you give them wrestling. Otherwise, they are going to get KOd virtually every time they fight.

For those curious, my team consists of a Hughes, a Maia, 2 BJ Penns, a Cro Cop, and 5 Liddells.

Other managers feel free to add your opinions.
  • 4

DO YOU HAVE THE BALLS?
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I am issuing an open challenge to Joel Nicola and Andrei Arlovski. Any time, any weight, any fighter, let's do it. You are frauds.

#2

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 09:20 PM

Lol Wade Wilson again biggrin.gif
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#3 PSUMike

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 09:32 PM

QUOTE (Jimsmithers @ Sep 19 2009, 05:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Lol Wade Wilson again biggrin.gif


He was the best pure example of a Maia.
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DO YOU HAVE THE BALLS?
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

I am issuing an open challenge to Joel Nicola and Andrei Arlovski. Any time, any weight, any fighter, let's do it. You are frauds.

#4

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 09:34 PM

QUOTE (PSUMike @ Sep 19 2009, 08:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The noobs guide to fighter building.

Other experienced users can feel to contribute and weigh in their opinions. I have enough fights under my belt that I think I know how to build fighters and I’ve been pretty successful. So I am creating this guide to help some newer users who may not know what they are doing. Now in all cases, conditioning and strength are very important so I am omitting them from essentials.
There are several ways to build fighters. Some work, some don’t. This guide should give you a pretty good understanding of how to build a good fighter. I am adding examples from in game fighters.

Styles that work:

Chuck Liddell (my personal favorite and most successful) – This is your standard sprawl and brawl boxer. They require good boxing and wrestling in the main stats. On top of that, good punches, takedown defense, striking defense, and defensive grappling are essential for success. In the physical stats, agility for the striking and balance for the takedown defense will help your guy tremendously. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and Granite Chin
Rufus Lee

Cro Cop – This is your Chuck Liddell with Muay Thai instead of boxing. High MT and wrestling are essential. Good kicks, punches, td defense, striking defense, and defensive grappling will keep the fight on the feet and your shin in your opponent’s jaw. Agility, balance, and flexibility are essential. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and Granite chin
Gay Pride (this is an early stage Cro Cop)

Jake Rosholt – This is your typical one dimensional wrestler. Probably something like wonderful wrestling with a blue belt. Don’t be afraid to put a little in his boxing as well. In order to pull this off, you need high striking defense, takedown offense and defense, as well as ground and pound or submissions (one or the other to start and build the other in the long run) and defensive grappling. The best physicals to have are speed and balance. Recommended hidden stats: Granite chin and big heart
Alexander Karelin

Damien Maia – Your BJJ stud who knows nothing else. There is only one, ONE way to pull this off successfully. High BJJ and the rest in wrestling…any other way is a recipe for failure. Striking defense, takedown offense, submissions, and defensive grappling are all needed to make a Maia. As far as physicals, flexibility and balance will help a lot. Recommended hidden stats: Granite chin and big heart
Wade Wilson

BJ Penn – This is your boxer/BJJ player mix. This one is a bit tricky and somewhat complicated but very effective if you can pull it off successfully. I like to go with high level punches, striking defense, submissions, and defensive grappling. You can also put some into takedown defense and build up his wrestling in case you fight a Maia. For this one, you’ll need agility and flexibility. Recommended hidden stats: KO power and big heart/granite chin
Layne Staley

Matt Hughes – This fighter is a top position grappler but more multi-faceted than a Rosholt. You can probably do it with maybe respectable wrestling and proficient BJJ or something of the sort. In order to pull this off, I suggest good striking defense, takedowns, either GNP or subs (I prefer submissions), and defensive grappling. Physical stats needed are speed and balance. If you go for subs over GNP, add some flexibility as well. Recommended hidden stats: Granite chin and big heart
Steve Austin

Anderson Silva – You guessed it. This is a MT/BJJ player. Maybe Pele would be a better fighter to describe this style but I am not sure how many people know who Jose “Pele” Landi Jons is. But I digress. Here’s how to pull this one off. I like to start them with somewhere around proficient MT and BJJ and then I like to build their boxing. Good kicks, punches, striking defense, submissions, and defensive grappling are needed. You can also throw in some takedown defense and build his wrestling in case you fight a Maia but that is a matter of personal preference. Agility and flexibility are needed to be effective. Recommended hidden stats: Natural KO power and granite chin
Harry Kalas

Styles you should avoid:
I am not going to give examples because that has potential to embarrass managers.

Michael Bisping – These guys are mediocre at everything but in reality, they suck in general. They can’t KO people (unless they suck), they can’t sub people (unless they suck), and as soon as they fight a specialized, properly built fighter, they get destroyed. Personally, when I see I am fighting a Bisping, I know I am going to win. Now this is a very controversial topic because some other respected managers will disagree with me and say this is an effective style. I say look at the top 10 P4P and tell me how many Bispings are on that list.

Nate Diaz – High level BJJ and shitty boxing…nothing more. As a general rule of thumb, when you build a high level BJJ player, make sure you give them wrestling. Otherwise, they are going to get KOd virtually every time they fight.

For those curious, my team consists of a Hughes, a Maia, 2 BJ Penns, a Cro Cop, and 5 Liddells.

Other managers feel free to add your opinions.


good stuff man thanks

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#5

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 09:38 PM

Decent post, but i prefer to give almost all my fighters a high starting conditioning. Helps with the training and in fights.
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#6 Dreaded

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 09:51 PM

QUOTE (Olaf @ Sep 19 2009, 10:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Decent post, but i prefer to give almost all my fighters a high starting conditioning. Helps with the training and in fights.

I'm the exact opposite. I give my fighters low conditioning to start only because it is so easy to train up.
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#7

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 09:53 PM

QUOTE (Dreaded @ Sep 19 2009, 09:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm the exact opposite. I give my fighters low conditioning to start only because it is so easy to train up.



with a high starting conditioning, you can squeeze in 10-12 training sessions per week right from when you create your fighter.
seems like the way to go for me smile.gif
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#8 royp777

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:09 PM

Good guide. I'll start sending some of my new managers to it. Thanks!
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#9

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:11 PM

but if you put points into speed and agility, condishining will pop faster so you save time in the long run..just my opinion
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#10

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:34 PM

Cobra Kai never Dies!

oh and Wade Wilson is the truth!
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#11 PSUMike

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:50 PM

QUOTE (Dreaded @ Sep 19 2009, 05:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm the exact opposite. I give my fighters low conditioning to start only because it is so easy to train up.


For my new fighters, I start them with 10 conditioning and 1 strength point and then train the shit out of them. Both are very easy to train up so I think it is more beneficial to put points toward other more important physical stats that don't train as quickly.
  • 0

DO YOU HAVE THE BALLS?
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

I am issuing an open challenge to Joel Nicola and Andrei Arlovski. Any time, any weight, any fighter, let's do it. You are frauds.

#12 sathias

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 11:11 PM

Excellent advice all round PSUMike smile.gif

The other variation I've been having some success with is a Chuck Liddell type but with good takedowns and ground and pound. It needs a bit of training to be effective but it can be quite versatile.

e.g. Bulk Bogan
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Wilson's Pharmaceuticals - makers of Coconut Creatine 144, The Island's first and only Strength Supplement

#13

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 11:22 PM

QUOTE (Olaf @ Sep 19 2009, 09:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
with a high starting conditioning, you can squeeze in 10-12 training sessions per week right from when you create your fighter.
seems like the way to go for me smile.gif

Yeah that's the slow way. Good job Mikey.
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#14 PSUMike

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 11:31 PM

QUOTE (sathias @ Sep 19 2009, 07:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Excellent advice all round PSUMike smile.gif

The other variation I've been having some success with is a Chuck Liddell type but with good takedowns and ground and pound. It needs a bit of training to be effective but it can be quite versatile.

e.g. Bulk Bogan


Updated. The Josh Koscheck style.
  • 0

DO YOU HAVE THE BALLS?
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

I am issuing an open challenge to Joel Nicola and Andrei Arlovski. Any time, any weight, any fighter, let's do it. You are frauds.

#15

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 11:31 PM

QUOTE (Steeve @ Sep 20 2009, 12:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yeah that's the slow way. Good job Mikey.



seems like i'm getting schooled tonight... injured.gif
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#16 PSUMike

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 11:41 PM

Just a matter of personal preference Olaf. I like to give my guys low conditioning and train it up because its easy to do. I think the points you save by doing this can be used in another stat that is harder to train like speed. Granted, it takes a long time and can be costly, but I have the time and the money to do it.
  • 0

DO YOU HAVE THE BALLS?
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

I am issuing an open challenge to Joel Nicola and Andrei Arlovski. Any time, any weight, any fighter, let's do it. You are frauds.

#17

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:18 AM

QUOTE (PSUMike @ Sep 19 2009, 04:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Chuck Liddell (my personal favorite and most successful) – This is your standard sprawl and brawl boxer. They require good boxing and wrestling in the main stats.
People always forget Chuck Liddell was a purple belt.

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#18 santa

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:28 AM

Why does damian maia needs balance?
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Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:42 AM

To help defend from sweeps I would guess. I doubt takedown defence is much of a priority for that type of build
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#20 santa

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 09:21 AM

Why would you need defence from sweeps? You can fight just as good on your back i think.
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