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Everything you want to know about project fighter creation & development


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#1 ovoxo

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 03:20 PM

Hey everyone,

 

I am not a man of many words, but I will try to share as much as possible information on the matter. If you feel something is missing or left unanswered, you can drop a comment with a question or to share your thoughts, so I can update my post in the future.

 

Important note: I do not claim by any way that this is the best possible way to create and develop a fighter. This is just what I am doing with my project fighters but it could be useful info to you as well.

 

This guide will be just for 18yo(or less) fighter creations. I think there is enough info about 25yo QFC creations so I am not going to focus on them.

 

I want to start with some statements, on which I base the creation and the training of my fighters:

 

- I prefer not to fight early with most of my projects, so this development could take you some months before a fighter is ready to fight in an org. During this guide I could mention from time to time what alternatives could you chose if you want to fight slightly earlier;

- Every fighter has a fixed hidden value at creation, which determines the total skill point limit he could achieve(it could go down with age and injuries), so I will focus on this type of creation and training which avoids investing points in skills you probably wouldn't use;

- I am not a fan of elbows and knees skills, because I don't find them effective enough to be worth the skill points;

- If you don't train a skill or if you aren't participating in fights, this skill starts degrading after some time;

- Never train with less than 85-90% energy and always keep your fighter's morale close to 100% - even if you must change clothes every day;

- Skills in this game are in the range between 1,95-150 points.

 

So here we go.

 

Creation

 

I would leave the basic creation stuff like height and weight up to you, just want you to know that I prefer my fighters not to be cutting much weight for a fight, because the benefits of not having to cut seem bigger than the benefits of fighting as the bigger fighter and having more power. Just don't do some weird stuff like creating a midget or a way too tall for his weight fighter.

 

Primaries

 

No matter if I am going to make a striker or a grappler, I am always starting with 110 Muay Thai and 10 Wrestling. The 110 MT for me is a must, since I want to reduce the MT sparring sessions I am going to do in future. MT sparring gives many points to elbows and knees skills, which take from your fighter total skill points limit. Don't worry that you are creating a grappler with Muay Thai as main primary skill - while you are developing his ground secondaries in the future, his Wrestling and BJJ would go up as well, because every time you train a secondary skill, the related to it primary skill goes up too, and vice-versa. For example, punches, striking defense and clinchwork benefit from training Boxing and Boxing benefits for training them. Here is the list of how skills are related, based on what I have seen:

 

Boxing - Punches, Striking Defense, Clinchwork

Muay Thai - Punches, Kicks, Elbows, Knees, Striking Defense, Clinchwork

Wrestling - Clinchwork, Takedown Offense, Takedown Defense, Ground and Pound, Defensive Grappling, Transitions, Escapes

BJJ - Ground and Pound, Submissions, Defensive Grappling, Transitions, Escapes.

 

Secondaries

 

For striking build - 110 punches, 110 kicks, 110 clinchwork. You can then train striking defense from zero because while training it, both your Boxing and MT primaries go up. If you want to fight earlier, you can swap kicks with striking defense and train kicks in the future.

 

For grappling build - 110 punches, 110 striking defense, 110 clinchwork. Since grapplers require many ground skills, in most cases you have to neglect kicks for that build. Then you start training ground secondaries and your Wrestling and BJJ start going up.

 

Always start with related Primary and Secondary skills at creation. Even if you decide to start with high Wrestling, choose Clinchwork, Takedown Defense(Offense) and Defensive Grappling. So you could raise the other Primary skills by training their related Secondary skills.

 

Physicals

 

Since only the training of primaries and secondaries depends on the learning speed hidden of a fighter(while physical training depends only on their age), it would be nice to start with very high conditioning, so your fighter could train secondaries for whole week without resting. Here I suggest - 110 conditioning, 1 balance(it seems to be slightly less important compared to the other physicals) and the points that are left you should spread equally between the other physical skills.

 

Hiddens

 

No matter what fighter I am creating, I always pick - KO power, Granite chin and Big heart.

 

First important steps after creation

 

You should get used to the fact that many of the fighters you create won't have the potential to become superstars, just because of their bad hidden skills, which the game assigns them randomly. Picking a hidden skill at creation just adds 30 points to it, so if your fighter rolls 1 points in KO power, he would have just 31 points with the bonus, which is still pretty low. So what do you do after you create your almighty fighter?

 

Step 1 - Check the learning speed.

 

To measure the learning speed with precision you have to be a VIP. What you should do is train one session right after creation - 1on1 with an elite coach. To get the correct value your fighter should be at 100% energy and both fighter and coach should be at 100% morale. Also you have to train a secondary skill which you left with 1 point at creation = useless--. After the training is over, you must go to the Skills Snapshot,which is accessible only for VIPs, and select the skill you have just trained. Double-click on the skill bar to highlight it, then right-click and select "View Selection Source". A new page will open with a line, similar to this one:

 

<td width="87.5%" background="images/barred.jpg">&nbsp;</td>

 

The width percentage value shows how much of the skill bar is filled. As we said, every skill could go up to 150 points so the full skill bar is 150 points. In this case, the skill I have shown has 150 * 87,5% = 131,25 points. Yes, this is an experienced fighter, not a new creation. For your new creation you might get values in between 3,5 and 7,5 points. After you calculate this for your fighter, here are my thoughts:

 

- under 5 points - you should sack that fighter. He prolly won't reach his total skill points before he retires;

- under 5.5 points - could develop well but needs a lot of patience and this game is already slow enough. Decision on keeping him is up to you, but you could also make him a KT(Kickboxing) fighter since they need to train less skills compared to the MMA fighters.

- over 5.5 points - should be good enough in training.

 

Step 2 - Participate in a test fight to get a clue about the other hiddens.

 

It is better to risk taking a loss in the beginning in a QFC fight than training a fighter for months and then see that he has awful hiddens. When the fight begins, you will be able to see some info about your fighter on the Tale of The Tape. There are many threads around this forum about the TOTT hierarchy of hiddens, so I won't focus on that. Just going to say that I am keeping only the fighters who show - Granite Chin, KO Power, Good Chin, Solid Chin, Heavy Handed and Big Right Hand - indicators of good Chin or KO power hiddens.

 

Another thing you could see about your fighter during a fight is his morale drop after a loss. If morale drops to about 0%, it means that your fighter has terrible confidence hidden and I don't suggest keeping him.


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#2 ovoxo

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 03:20 PM

Training

 

Here you can see detailed info of how training and sparring really work.

 

There are many different ways to train and develop a fighter. What you should know is that you shouldn't throw your fighter in a serious org fight if he doesn't have:

 

- good(for his age and ID) physical skills;

- similar, compared to his opponent's primary skills;

- stand-up and ground defensive secondaries - striking defense and defensive grappling - if you lack any of those, your opponents are going to finish you in the first two minutes of a fight.

 

Both physical and primary skills seem to have serious effect in early ID fights, when fighters are far from their peak. But, speaking of end-game, secondary skills could be a difference-maker. So if you want to fight early on, you should turn your focus to primary and physical skills. As I said, this guide will be more about long-term development.

 

To maximize the use of the learning speed of an 18 yo project, I am always starting with training secondary skills. On a weekly basis, that would mean 11 training sessions for secondary skills and 1 CT session to gradually build physicals up. You should be always looking for 1on1 or 2on1 training sessions with elite coaches. If there are many fighters training with a coach, then they won't learn much from that session. Here is a graph which shows the differences between 1on1, 2on1, 3on1 and etc.:

 

Fighters_per_session.jpg

 

 

We are looking at the new curve - everyone could see that training benefit goes down significantly when number of fighters goes up. From my experience 2on1 isn't that much worse than 1on1, especially if your project is training with a fighter who is elite in that skill. Your project gets benefit from this, because he is learning not only from the coach, but from the better fighter as well.

 

When to stop training a secondary skill?

 

Realistically, your goal is to reach at least Elite-- in the secondary skills you are planning to use, but Elite++ would be perfect for your peaked fighter if you are patient enough. Anyway, if you don't wanna wait 6-10 months before your fighter is ready, you can decide to train all important skills up to Wonderful, or Exceptional, or Sensational, raise the physicals up and throw him in some fights.

 

If you decide not to fight, you should keep in mind that your fighter's skills are going to degrade if you don't train them once in a while. Keeping track of this seems very hard so what I am doing is always training a skill to a -- level(Wonderful--, Sensational--, Elite-- and so on). Once this skill starts degrading, it immediately drops to the lower level. I could notice it on my Assistant page, then train it once to pop it back up and reset the depop ticker(meaning it won't be degrading for a while). Also, I am doing a sparring session of each discipline roughly once in two months to reset the tickers of the Primary skills.

 

Which type of fighter needs what?

 

Strikers:

 

- Punches;

- Kicks;

- Striking defense;

- Clinchwork;

- Takedown defense;

- Defensive grappling;

- Transitions and/or Escapes.

 

You should have already figured out by yourselves that your fighter can't have all secondaries at Elite level, because of the total skill points cap. This is why you have to make a decision if you would like to have transitions more for that build, or escapes.

 

Grapplers:

 

- Punches;

- Striking defense;

- Clinchwork;

- Takedown offense;

- Defensive grappling;

- Ground and Pound and/or Submissions;

- Transitions.

 

Anyway, you could always mix it up(if you know how to employ it in your fight plans) and swap some secondary skills. For example, you can make a grappler with kicks but no ground and pound.

 

What is a No-Go:

 

- having a fighter without punches or clinchwork. Clinchwork is the most important skill in the clinch, so without it you are going to be destroyed, while punches are an universal offensive skill which could be used both from stand-up and in the clinch;

- to repeat myself - having a fighter without striking defense or defensive grappling;

- having Ground and Pound without Transitions. You need to get in a good position to land damaging ground and pound;

- having a master grappler but giving him points to senseless skill like escapes.

 

 

 

Once your fighter has reached the desired levels of secondary skills, you should turn your attention to building physicals with Circuit Trainings and Primaries with sparring sessions. Or you could start mixing secondaries with CTs and sparring a bit earlier, it is up to you.


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#3 ovoxo

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 03:21 PM

Sparring

 

First of all, it is very nice to have high primaries, but you shouldn't depend only on sparring because high primaries are nothing if secondaries are low. Anyway, you should aim to get at least 3 out of 4 Primary skills to an elite level.

 

Important notes on sparring:

 

- Never do 2 straight sparring sessions, because the second one would get a penalty, meaning that Monday AM and PM is a no-go for two sparring sessions. Same goes for Monday PM and Tuesday AM. Only Saturday PM and Monday AM is not punishable since there are two Sunday rest sessions in between;

- Never spar alone. Sparring alone = rest session;

- Each fighter has a stat called "sparring worth" which is different than his Primary skill, because the sparring worth consists of the primary skill itself but also of the secondary skills, related to that Primary. Physicals and experience play a small role in calculating the sparring worth as well. For example, Boxing sparring worth is determined by the Boxing primary skill, Punches, Striking Defense, Clinchwork and physical skills. Sparring worth determines how much your fighter helps the sparring group by improving the average sparring worth of the group.

 

Perfect gains from sparring:

 

To gain the maximum from a sparring session, your fighter needs to be in a group of at least 5 fighters with an average sparring worth of the group 20% bigger than his primary skill.

 

Sparring group size:

 

You should always aim to participate in sparring groups with at least 5 fighters in them. Sparring with less than 5 fighters is 12 % less effective.

But also groups of 10+ fighters get split into two smaller groups. 15+ fighters get split into three smaller groups and so on. Always the top 5 fighters get into a separate group. So you should be careful that your fighter won't be left training with other newbies. To make it easier to manage, I am generally aiming to participate in 5-9 fighter groups.

 

Advice on sparring:

 

- First of all, Boxing is your friend. By sparring Boxing, you get points to the following secondary skills - punches, striking defense and clinchwork. No matter if your fighter is a striker or grappler, he would always benefit from those 3 secondary skills;

- Second, Muay Thai is probably your worst enemy. Sparring it will give points to elbows, knees, which doesn't seem to be better or more useful skills than punches in the clinch. You could have a better use of the spare points of your total skill points limit. I am sparring MT just to reset it when it starts degrading. If you start with 110 MT, training your secondaries should just be enough to get it to Sensational-Elite level;

- You would need to spar some Wrestling to get it to Elite level, since training secondaries won't be enough. Wrestling is very important primary because it allows you to control the position of the fight. Also don't forget that this is not a MT simulation game, but an MMA one - there is a lot of wrestling involved in the clinch;

- If your fighter is a pure striker, you can spar BJJ just to keep it from degrading. A striker should be doing fine with just Brown BJJ belt. But if you want your fighter to be a crafty submission artist - you should be aiming for a Black, or even a Red BJJ belt.

 

 

 

I think this is it with the guide. If anything else comes to my mind, I would come back and update it. Also feel free to ask below any questions that might have left unanswered to you while reading it. Hope it could be helpful for you guys.

 

Cheers!


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Posted 08 August 2017 - 03:22 PM

This fighter is prime example. 

 

http://www.mmatycoon....php?FID=320765


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#5 Rambo

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 05:11 PM

Fight early and fight often. Every 2-4 weeks at least. 21-28 days for 18 year old is enough time to prepare for a fight vs any opponent of equal creation date.

 

 

Otherwise, good job. I've put things like this together just not nearly as structured. It'll definitely get added to my new user guide.


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#6 mmagladiators

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

great job! sending this to all future noobs


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#7 SixFootPenguin

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 06:47 PM

Being a noob in my first month of this game and wanting to start a 18 year old at the end of this month after I make some money, this is an amazing guide.  I have been doing 25 year olds just to get me started and I wasn't quite sure how to effectively go about making my 18 year old and now I have a few different ideas of what to do and I appreciate it.  Also will be sending this to future noobs as it helped me.


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#8 RegularJohn

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:34 PM

great thread.

 

I would only argue that creating fighters with minimum cardio and strenght may be the optimal build, since they're the fastest skills to train, and it's not me a noob who's saying but my mentor who's a top ten manager in the game right now.


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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:39 PM

great thread.

 

I would only argue that creating fighters with minimum cardio and strenght may be the optimal build, since they're the fastest skills to train, and it's not me a noob who's saying but my mentor who's a top ten manager in the game right now.

 

If you are able to train in private gym with 1 on 1 coach you would better go with 110 in cardio because physicals train at the same speed at every age and it would be better to have as much as possible training time with coach when you are younger.
 
Who is your mentor?

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#10 xanax

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 03:33 AM

Good job man.
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You got that medicine I need

Dope, shoot it up, straight to the heart please


#11 ericj

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:01 PM

thanks man this really helped because after all the defensive stats and punches and clinchwork i didnt know what to train next 


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#12 Monsieur.Camara

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 12:22 AM

Great job !!!  thank you.


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#13 BlakePhoenix

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:53 PM

I tested my last 15 new creation 18 year old fighters' learning speed using the method listed above. The highest learning speed out of these 15 fighters was 4.8. - and I selected fast learner as one of his hiddens. Based on this guide, I should sack all 15 of them. I'm not necessarily disagreeing with that, but why TF are ALL of my fighters slow learners?


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#14 ovoxo

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 08:30 PM

I tested my last 15 new creation 18 year old fighters' learning speed using the method listed above. The highest learning speed out of these 15 fighters was 4.8. - and I selected fast learner as one of his hiddens. Based on this guide, I should sack all 15 of them. I'm not necessarily disagreeing with that, but why TF are ALL of my fighters slow learners?


Was 4.8 the increase of the skill or the skill value after the session?
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#15 BlakePhoenix

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 08:45 PM

Was 4.8 the increase of the skill or the skill value after the session?

4.8 was the % of the bar which was full after 1 training session following the instructions which you posted above:

 

... And as I just now re-read your post, I see that I was supposed to have multiplied the % times 150 to get the # of points - my bad.

 

So 4.8% * 150 = 7.2 points, which is actually quite good. Right?


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#16 GBK16

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 09:02 PM

4.8 was the % of the bar which was full after 1 training session following the instructions which you posted above:

 

... And as I just now re-read your post, I see that I was supposed to have multiplied the % times 150 to get the # of points - my bad.

 

So 4.8% * 150 = 7.2 points, which is actually quite good. Right?

Max you can get is 7.5 so that's fantastic


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#17 alcapone

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 09:43 AM

Great thread

to bad i create so many muay thai dudes with clinch, knees & elbows, lol


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#18 RegularJohn

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 01:10 PM

Great thread

to bad i create so many muay thai dudes with clinch, knees & elbows, lol

 

those are useless long term but can be very effective at the noob stages of the game.


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#19 Unibjorn

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 01:11 PM

Not bad for a new manager


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#20 Bwang

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 07:11 PM

Great thread
to bad i create so many muay thai dudes with clinch, knees & elbows, lol


You should also only make 18 or 25 yr olds, unlike your Steve Strongman. (Tempting as it is to try something different!)

MT guys with knees and elbows are fine if you keep them in KT orgs.
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